Monday, May 11, 2020

Analysis Of The Poem Dream By Langston Hughes

Veronica Rincon English 1 Prof. Young June 14, 2016 Regret The structure and meaning of each poem are very similar, but yet are different in their own unique way as well. The two pomes are about dreams, the first poem, Dream is about what could possibly happen if we let go of our dreams and don t purse them. The second poem, Harlem is about the possibilities of what could happen when we postpone our dreams. Both poems do not exactly end with a happy ending, for they show the regret that we will be left with, possibly even death. The poem Dream by Langston Hughes is about following your dreams, because we never know what our near future can become if we do not attempt to accomplish our visions in life. One way to define the word dreams is to refer to them as a reflection of our possibilities that we desire to think about and aspire to achieve. To add on, not only can dreams get us through hard times, but they are a reminder to ourselves to keep going, plus they provide you with a purpose in life. Hughes states, Hold fas t to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that can not fly, meaning if one does not hold fast to their dreams and make them a reality then, we will never get to see what our life could have turned out to be and we ll be left with sadness and regret. Although Hughes illustrates the bird having a broken wing, it is still alive and breathing, the bird can still chirp and it can still be healed: those dreams willShow MoreRelatedEssay about Analysis of Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes615 Words   |  3 PagesAnalysis of Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes Dreams are the driving force of America today. Every person has some sort of dreams and or goals. Although in life everyone has dreams and goals, there are obviously more struggles for some ethnic groups than for others. The poem, Dream Deferred, by Langston Hughes, is one mans expression of his dreams during a difficult time period. As a black man in a time period where African-Americans were considered an inferior group of peopleRead MoreLiterary Analysis of Langston Hughess A Dream Deferred1028 Words   |  4 Pagescirculated, analysis of the poem must take place. It unveils and discusses the themes, figures of speech, word placement, and flow of the piece, and A Dream Deferred, is no exception. In Langston Hughess poem, A Dream Deferred, the theme is that no really knows to dreams if they are not reached, and very realistic figures of speech help convey this idea; the poem can be surprisingly related to Mr. Hughess life through the subtitle and quotes from Langston himself. The meaning of, A Dream DeferredRead MoreLangston Hughes : A Modernist1222 Words   |  5 PagesSappington 13 Apr. 2017 Langston Hughes: A Modernist Credited as being the most recognizable figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes played a vital role in the Modernist literary movement and the movement to revitalize African American culture in the early 20th century. Hughes’s poems reflect his personal struggle and the collective struggle of African Americans during this cultural revival. Langston Hughes’s life contained key influences on his work. As a child, Hughes witnessed a divorceRead MoreHarlem: a Dream Deferred1043 Words   |  5 PagesHarlem: A Dream Deferred Langston Hughes Literally Analysis Dreams are aspirations that we hope to reach on our lifetime. They are the day that gives us the drive to live our lives and accomplish our goals. When reaching our goals, we will do anything to get to our destination. But what happens when your dreams deferred and put on hold due to unseen circumstances? Or what do you so when someone tells you that you can not so the things you want to so because of the pigmentation of your skinRead MoreAnalysis Of The Literary Work Let America Be America Again By Langston Hughes1324 Words   |  6 PagesTara Lesko English 102 Historical analysis of the literary work â€Å"Let America be America Again† by Langston Hughes Man has always been interested in analyzing issues in the history of the world. People tend to appreciate it when grand historical events are described in works of literature. Consequently, writers and poets, try to capture every single step of societal and personal experiences in their works. One of such writers is Langston Hughes whose poem â€Å"Let America be America Again† speaksRead MoreAnalysis of Harlem by Langston Hughes602 Words   |  3 PagesAnalysis of Harlem by Langston Hughes Through the turbulent decades of the 1920s through the 1960s many of the black Americans went through difficult hardships and found comfort only in dreaming. Those especially who lived in the ghettos of Harlem would dream about a better place for them, their families, and their futures. Langston Hughes discusses dreams and what they could do in one of his poems, Harlem. Hughes poem begins: What happens to a dream deferred... Hughes is askingRead MoreLet America be America again analysis856 Words   |  4 Pages Let America be America Again Analysis In Langston Hughes poem â€Å"Let America be America Again† he talks about how America should return to the way that it was perceived to be in the dreams before America was truly America. Throughout the poem he uses various methods to evoke the patriotic images and dreams that he feels America should and will eventually be. Hughes states that America is supposed to be a place of equality for everyone including both white and colored people. During this periodRead MoreReoccurring Themes in the Work of Langston Hughes Essay1649 Words   |  7 PagesLangston Hughes is an extremely successful and well known black writer who emerged from the Harlem Renaissance (â€Å"Langston Hughes† 792). He is recognized for his poetry and like many other writers from the Harlem Renaissance, lived most of his life outside of Harlem (â€Å"Langston Hughes† 792). His personal experiences and opinions inspire his writing intricately. Unlike other writers of his time, Hughes expresses his discontent with black oppression and focuses on the hardships of his people. Hughes’Read MoreAnalysis Of The Poem Harlem 1303 Words   |  6 PagesJames Mercer Langston Hughes was an American poet; a Joplin, Missouri native and an active, versatile writer, earning acclaim as a poet, novelist, playwright and columnist. He was one of the first poets to explore an innovative sing-songy, stylized delivery called jazz poetry. As an African-American, his point of view, collectively synergized with this then-new literary art, catapulted his writings between the 1930s - 1960s. He is often credited as the leader of the Harlem Renaissance, and â€Å"famouslyRead MoreLiterary Analysis Of Langston Hughes961 Words   |  4 PagesComing Quick (A Literary Analysis of Langston Hughes’ Poems) The nineteenth and twentieth centuries were impressive times for the growing of several different cultures. One of the main cultures that grew through those time periods was that of the black community. Those with darker skin color were pushed to their limits and they were still able to persevere. One writer in particular truly made a influence not only on his culture but on the rest of America, too. Langston Hughes was an astonishing influence

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

H.G. Wells’s Time Machine Free Essays

The cultural and intellectual climate of the last decade of nineteenth century was dominated by the theory of evolution and socialist ideas. It was an age when aristocratic gentlemen had the time and inclination to discuss and debate upon all kinds of social and scientific things, including time travel. At the very beginning, the novel succeeds in setting a tone of passionate intellectual curiosity and open-minded enquiry. We will write a custom essay sample on H.G. Wells’s Time Machine or any similar topic only for you Order Now Protagonist’s Journey of Plot and Conflict The Protagonist: The novel’s protagonist, identified only as the Time Traveller, is essentially a scientist and inventor. He is very scientifically minded, and comes out as a character whose life is dedicated to scientific advancement and understanding the nature of the world and life. Reason is central to his outlook of the world. In his investigations, he has stumbled upon some radical insights in the structure of reality, which lead him to build his fantastic time machine. The initial events: The novel begins as the Time Traveller invites his friends to inspect his new invention – a time machine. He explains the idea to them†¦ There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time†¦ There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it. (1) Scientists and mathematicians have been talking about a possible fourth dimension before him, but our inventor rightly identifies the fourth dimension not with an extra spatial dimension but with time. He then shows his friends a small model of his invention — a metallic frame with ivory and quartz parts. One lever can propel it toward the future, and another can reverse the direction. He helps one of his friends push the future lever, and the model promptly disappears. Where did it go? It did not move in space at all; it simply went to another time, the Time Traveller explains. His friends cannot decide whether to believe him. Next, the Time Traveller takes his friends to his home laboratory, to see his nearly complete, full-scale model. A week later he finishes the time machine, climbs aboard, and begins a remarkable journey to the future. The narrative is recounted in flash back, after the Time Traveller is back from his adventures. Seated in his time machine, the Time Traveller first presses the future lever gently forward. Then he presses the one for stopping. He looks at his lab. Everything is the same. Then he notices the clock: â€Å"A moment before, as it seemed, it had stood at a minute or so past ten; now it was nearly half-past three!† He pushes the lever ahead again, and he can see his housekeeper flit across the room at high speed. Then he pushes the lever far forward. The night came like the turning out of a light, and in another moment came tomorrow†¦. As I put on a pace, night followed day like the flapping of a black wing†¦ Presently, as I went on, still gaining velocity, the palpitation of night and day merged into one continuous grayness†¦ I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams. (1) Eventually, the Time Traveller brings his vehicle to a stop. The machine’s dials show that he has arrived in the year 802,701. What does he find? The Conflict: In the distant future where the Time Traveller lands, the human race has split into two species: one, brutish and mean, living below ground — the Morlocks; the other, childlike and gentle, living above ground — the Eloi. The central conflict of the novel revolves around these two groups. The Time Traveller identifies himself with the Eloi, at least to a degree, and among them he finds a lovely young woman named Weena, whom he befriends. Weena can be considered as the protagonist’s love interest. But soon he discovers, to his horror, that the troglodytes living below are cannibals and prey on the Eloi. Several adventures follow. The action scene of peak importance is the Time Traveller reclaiming his Time Machine stolen by the Morlocks escaping. The Climax: The novel has a kind of apocalyptic climax/anticlimax. Escaping from the Morlocks, the protagonist pushes the lever into the extreme forward position. By the time he is able to bring the machine under control, he has moved into the far future. Mammals have become extinct, and only some crablike creatures and butterflies remain on Earth. He explores as far as 30 million years into the future, where he discovers a dull red Sun and lichen-like vegetation; the only animal life in evidence is a football-shaped creature with tentacles. Wells’s Time Traveller witnesses the end of the world, and apocalyptic vision that he carries back to the present. His revelation of finiteness implies that we can expect and must accept an end to life, an inevitable doomsday. The Epilogue: The Time Traveller then returns to his own time and to his friends. As proof of his experience in the future, he produces a couple of flowers Weena had given him, of a type unknown to his friends. After talking to his friends, the Time Traveller departs on his time machine and never returns. The narrator wonders about his fate. Where did he go? Did he return to the future or go instead to some prehistoric realm? Narration The bulk of the story is told from the viewpoint of the Time Traveller. The substance of the story is, however, framed within the narration of one of Time Traveller’s guests. This guest, the frame narrator, introduces the Time Traveller and lets him relate his adventure in an inset narrative. The frame narrator’s outside viewpoint carries a degree of objectivity and gives credibility to the inventor’s   inset narrative. He grounds the story in a reality with which the audience can identify before and after experiencing the wondrous trip in the time machine. With the return to familiar surroundings, the reader, like the Time Traveller, might question the reality of such a strange experience (â€Å"Is it all only a dream? They say life is a dream†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ), but the presence of an honorable gentleman in the form of frame narrator gives more plausibility to the narrative of the protagonist who is by nature a dreamer and a visionary. Theme and Meaning Wells’s inventor’s interest in time traveling seems primarily for the sake of scientific accomplishment, to gain knowledge for knowledge’s sake. H.G. Wells’ story begins with, and constantly refers back to, the time machine itself. However, the machine is simply a device allowing the author to present his own perspective on a possible future. The main thrust of the story lies in this form of forecasting and prediction and also in the social comment about the conflicts between different classes or kinds of society. The main intent is not so much to explore the questions of time, but to illustrate the ultimate possible consequence of social and economic divisions of humanity. Thus, this story can be seen more as a social and political criticism than science fiction. The Time Traveller does not have a definite cause and effect explanation for the Eloi’s society. To shape his theories he relies on the scientific method, using empirical evidence to reach conclusion that he reformulates with the discovery of new information. However, his inconclusive conclusions are largely conjectures.   The Time Traveller bases his hypotheses on socioeconomic conditions and theories (especially socialism) prevalent in his own period of the late nineteenth century, and on a metaphorical image of the capitalist and worker. Without knowledge of some causal chain, he lacks definite information to show what other variable elements may have affected mankind to produce the bifurcation of the human species and the predator-prey relationship of the Morlock and Eloi. While such ambiguities raise many unanswerable questions, the message that comes out of them is clear: any kind of widening gap between groups of human race can prove costly in the end. The novel also answers one thing most directly: Eventually there will not be a trace of humanity left, the earth will become desolate and barren. The vision of the end of the world is perhaps the most haunting and yet the most enlightening aspect of this work, to me. I also wonder how it would have been if the Time Traveller pushed further, if only to catch the briefest glimpse into eternity. Conclusion No idea from science fiction has captured the human imagination as much as time travel. We seem free to move around in space at will, but in time we are like helpless rafters in a mighty stream, propelled into the future at the rate of one second per second. One wishes one could sometimes paddle ahead to investigate the shores of the future, or perhaps turn around and go against the current to visit the past. The hope that such freedom will one day be ours is sustained when we observe that many feats formerly thought impossible have now been realized and are even taken for granted. When Wells wrote The Time Machine in 1895, many people thought that heavier-than-air flying machines were impossible. But just eight years later the Wright brothers proved the skeptics wrong. Flights to the Moon too strictly belonged to the realm of fantasy – until Apollo program achieved it. Might time travel be similar? Wells’s swift-paced classic science fiction tale challenges us to dare to dream the impossible. The idea of time travel gained prominence through Wells’s wonderful novel. Most remarkable is his treatment of time as a fourth dimension, which uncannily anticipates Einstein’s use of the concept several years later. Interestingly, the Time Machine was Wells’ first novel, and enjoyed an instant popularity, rescuing its author from obscurity and poverty. Today it stands as one of the greatest pioneering science fiction tales. I would like to read Jules Verne’s A Journey to the Moon after this. References: Wells H. G. (1898). The Time Machine. Retrieved May 10 2007 from http://www.gutenberg.org/files/35/35.txt How to cite H.G. Wells’s Time Machine, Essay examples H.G. Wells’s Time Machine Free Essays The Protagonist: The novel’s protagonist, identified only as the Time Traveller, is essentially a scientist and inventor. He is very scientifically minded, and comes out as a character whose life is dedicated to scientific advancement and understanding the nature of the world and life. Reason is central to his outlook of the world. We will write a custom essay sample on H.G. Wells’s Time Machine or any similar topic only for you Order Now In his investigations, he has stumbled upon some radical insights in the structure of reality, which lead him to build his fantastic time machine. The initial events: The novel begins as the Time Traveller invites his friends to inspect his new invention – a time machine. He explains the idea to them†¦ There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time†¦ There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it. (1) Scientists and mathematicians have been talking about a possible fourth dimension before him, but our inventor rightly identifies the fourth dimension not with an extra spatial dimension but with time. He then shows his friends a small model of his invention — a metallic frame with ivory and quartz parts. One lever can propel it toward the future, and another can reverse the direction. He helps one of his friends push the future lever, and the model promptly disappears. Where did it go? It did not move in space at all; it simply went to another time, the Time Traveller explains. His friends cannot decide whether to believe him. Next, the Time Traveller takes his friends to his home laboratory, to see his nearly complete, full-scale model. A week later he finishes the time machine, climbs aboard, and begins a remarkable journey to the future. The narrative is recounted in flash back, after the Time Traveller is back from his adventures. Seated in his time machine, the Time Traveller first presses the future lever gently forward. Then he presses the one for stopping. He looks at his lab. Everything is the same. Then he notices the clock: â€Å"A moment before, as it seemed, it had stood at a minute or so past ten; now it was nearly half-past three!† He pushes the lever ahead again, and he can see his housekeeper flit across the room at high speed. Then he pushes the lever far forward. The night came like the turning out of a light, and in another moment came tomorrow†¦. As I put on a pace, night followed day like the flapping of a black wing†¦ Presently, as I went on, still gaining velocity, the palpitation of night and day merged into one continuous grayness†¦ I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams. (1) Eventually, the Time Traveller brings his vehicle to a stop. The machine’s dials show that he has arrived in the year 802,701. What does he find? The Conflict: In the distant future where the Time Traveller lands, the human race has split into two species: one, brutish and mean, living below ground — the Morlocks; the other, childlike and gentle, living above ground — the Eloi. The central conflict of the novel revolves around these two groups. The Time Traveller identifies himself with the Eloi, at least to a degree, and among them he finds a lovely young woman named Weena, whom he befriends. Weena can be considered as the protagonist’s love interest. But soon he discovers, to his horror, that the troglodytes living below are cannibals and prey on the Eloi. Several adventures follow. The action scene of peak importance is the Time Traveller reclaiming his Time Machine stolen by the Morlocks escaping. The Climax: The novel has a kind of apocalyptic climax/anticlimax. Escaping from the Morlocks, the protagonist pushes the lever into the extreme forward position. By the time he is able to bring the machine under control, he has moved into the far future. Mammals have become extinct, and only some crablike creatures and butterflies remain on Earth. He explores as far as 30 million years into the future, where he discovers a dull red Sun and lichen-like vegetation; the only animal life in evidence is a football-shaped creature with tentacles. Wells’s Time Traveller witnesses the end of the world, and apocalyptic vision that he carries back to the present. His revelation of finiteness implies that we can expect and must accept an end to life, an inevitable doomsday. The Epilogue: The Time Traveller then returns to his own time and to his friends. As proof of his experience in the future, he produces a couple of flowers Weena had given him, of a type unknown to his friends. After talking to his friends, the Time Traveller departs on his time machine and never returns. The narrator wonders about his fate. Where did he go? Did he return to the future or go instead to some prehistoric realm? The bulk of the story is told from the viewpoint of the Time Traveller. The substance of the story is, however, framed within the narration of one of Time Traveller’s guests. This guest, the frame narrator, introduces the Time Traveller and lets him relate his adventure in an inset narrative. The frame narrator’s outside viewpoint carries a degree of objectivity and gives credibility to the inventor’s   inset narrative. He grounds the story in a reality with which the audience can identify before and after experiencing the wondrous trip in the time machine. With the return to familiar surroundings, the reader, like the Time Traveller, might question the reality of such a strange experience (â€Å"Is it all only a dream? They say life is a dream†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ), but the presence of an honorable gentleman in the form of frame narrator gives more plausibility to the narrative of the protagonist who is by nature a dreamer and a visionary. Wells’s inventor’s interest in time traveling seems primarily for the sake of scientific accomplishment, to gain knowledge for knowledge’s sake. H.G. Wells’ story begins with, and constantly refers back to, the time machine itself. However, the machine is simply a device allowing the author to present his own perspective on a possible future. The main thrust of the story lies in this form of forecasting and prediction and also in the social comment about the conflicts between different classes or kinds of society. The main intent is not so much to explore the questions of time, but to illustrate the ultimate possible consequence of social and economic divisions of humanity. Thus, this story can be seen more as a social and political criticism than science fiction. The Time Traveller does not have a definite cause and effect explanation for the Eloi’s society. To shape his theories he relies on the scientific method, using empirical evidence to reach conclusion that he reformulates with the discovery of new information. However, his inconclusive conclusions are largely conjectures.   The Time Traveller bases his hypotheses on socioeconomic conditions and theories (especially socialism) prevalent in his own period of the late nineteenth century, and on a metaphorical image of the capitalist and worker. Without knowledge of some causal chain, he lacks definite information to show what other variable elements may have affected mankind to produce the bifurcation of the human species and the predator-prey relationship of the Morlock and Eloi. While such ambiguities raise many unanswerable questions, the message that comes out of them is clear: any kind of widening gap between groups of human race can prove costly in the end. The novel also answers one thing most directly: Eventually there will not be a trace of humanity left, the earth will become desolate and barren. The vision of the end of the world is perhaps the most haunting and yet the most enlightening aspect of this work, to me. I also wonder how it would have been if the Time Traveller pushed further, if only to catch the briefest glimpse into eternity. No idea from science fiction has captured the human imagination as much as time travel. We seem free to move around in space at will, but in time we are like helpless rafters in a mighty stream, propelled into the future at the rate of one second per second. One wishes one could sometimes paddle ahead to investigate the shores of the future, or perhaps turn around and go against the current to visit the past. The hope that such freedom will one day be ours is sustained when we observe that many feats formerly thought impossible have now been realized and are even taken for granted. When Wells wrote The Time Machine in 1895, many people thought that heavier-than-air flying machines were impossible. But just eight years later the Wright brothers proved the skeptics wrong. Flights to the Moon too strictly belonged to the realm of fantasy – until Apollo program achieved it. Might time travel be similar? Wells’s swift-paced classic science fiction tale challenges us to dare to dream the impossible. The idea of time travel gained prominence through Wells’s wonderful novel. Most remarkable is his treatment of time as a fourth dimension, which uncannily anticipates Einstein’s use of the concept several years later. Interestingly, the Time Machine was Wells’ first novel, and enjoyed an instant popularity, rescuing its author from obscurity and poverty. Today it stands as one of the greatest pioneering science fiction tales. I would like to read Jules Verne’s A Journey to the Moon after this. References: 1.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Wells H. G. (1898). The Time Machine. Retrieved May 10 2007 from http://www.gutenberg.org/files/35/35.txt How to cite H.G. Wells’s Time Machine, Essay examples

Thursday, April 30, 2020

women and shopping Essay Example

women and shopping Essay There has always been a lot of interest in what actually goes on at an Ann Summers Party. Particularly by men I wonder why? Well, its really no big secret. You organise for a bunch of women to be sitting comfortably in a friends home, with a glass of wine in one hand and a bowl of nibbles in the other, and you go out of your way to make sure that all these women have a good girly night in! My parties usually last about two to two and a half hours long, Brilliant for a Friday or Saturday night because you have your party booked to start at around 8pm and by 10.30pm you and all your mates are in the pub or the nightclub having already had a few drinks and well in the mood for a good night out! Well contrary to popular belief, your Ann Summers Party Organiser is not there to make complete fools out of you all (although the odd faked orgasm doesnt go amiss). Our aim is to entertain you and give you the option to look at and purchase items that you wouldnt normally browse in a shop for . We will usually start off with introductions, and run through all the things you need to know about payments; delivery dates; guarantees etc, and then we will loosen things up with a couple of party games. How risqu the games are is entirely up to the guests at the party, you can choose whether to be completely mad and make fools out of your friends or just to have a bit of a giggle, there is something for everyone! After the games we will start with the demonstration. This usually takes about an hour and you will be shown a selection of underwear, novelties, and sex toys! After the demonstration your organiser will encourage you to try on items of lingerie that you like, and will be on hand for you to approach with any questions you may have about the products. There will usually be a raffle during the evening where you will get the chance to win Ann Summ

Saturday, March 21, 2020

The Indwelling essays

The Indwelling essays Thesis: The major conflict in the novel The Indwelling by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins is God vs. Satan. The Indwelling is the seventh book in the Left Behind series written by the fiction writer Jerry B. Jenkins and biblical end-times scholar Tim LaHaye. The Left Behind series is about a post-Rapture end-times battle between the believers, the "Tribulation Saints," and the Antichrist, Nicolae Carpathia. The conflict is God versus Satan. The major theme of the story is that good always wins in the end. The first example of conflict in The Indwelling is in Tsion Ben-Judah's dreams of the war in heaven and the falling away of Lucifer 242-248. Lucifer is pleading with God to let him have complete control of mankind so he could form an army like none other: "'Abandon them to me, who can fashion them for profit. Even after being called by your name, their natures reek with temporal desires. Allow me to surround myself with these enemies of your cause, and I will marshal them into a force unlike any army you have ever assembled.' From the throne came a voice of such power and authority that volume was irrelevant: 'Thou shalt not touch my beloved!'" 245. Lucifer evolves his pleas into threats, threatening to ascend to a throne above that of God's. This is the moment in which Archangel Michael chooses to step in. In this fashion, the war in heaven is waged and Satan with a third of the heavenly host is cast down to the earth. The second example of the God vs. Satan theme is in the killing by incineration of the three regional potentates that oppose Carpathia by Fortunato 350. The reason Fortunato kills the three potentates is that they refuse to bow down and worship the idol of Nicolae Carpathia. The three potentates are believers, which is why they will not bow. The third example of the major conflict is the resurrection and indwelling of Nicolae Carpathia by Satan himself 366. Everything that Satan does...

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Glossary of Holocaust Terms to Know

Glossary of Holocaust Terms to Know A tragic and important part of world history, it is important to understand what the  Holocaust  entailed, how it came to be and who were the major actors. When studying the Holocaust, one can come across numerous terms in many different languages as the Holocaust affected people from all sorts of backgrounds, be it German, Jewish, Roma and so on. This glossary lists slogans, code names, names of important people, dates, slang words and more to help you understand these terms in alphabetical order. A Words Aktion is a term used for any non-military campaign to further Nazi ideals of race, but most often referred to the assembly and deportation of Jews to concentration or death camps. Aktion Reinhard was the code name for the annihilation of European Jewry. It was named after Reinhard Heydrich. Aktion T-4 was the code name for the Nazis Euthanasia Program. The name was taken from the Reich Chancellery buildings address, Tiergarten Strasse 4. Aliya means  immigration in Hebrew. It refers to the Jewish immigration into Palestine and, later, Israel through official channels. Aliya Bet means  illegal immigration in Hebrew. This was the Jewish immigration into Palestine and Israel without official immigration certificates nor with British approval. During the Third Reich, Zionist movements set up organizations to plan and implement these flights from Europe, such as  Exodus 1947. Anschluss means  linkage in German. In the context of World War II, the word refers to the German annexation of Austria on March 13, 1938. Anti-semitism is a prejudice against Jews. Appell means  roll call in German. Within the camps, inmates were forced to stand at attention for hours at least twice a day while they were counted. This was always carried out no matter what the weather and often lasted for hours. It was also often accompanied by beatings and punishments. Appellplatz translates to  place for roll call in German. It was the location within the camps where the Appell was carried out. Arbeit Macht Frei is a phrase in German that means  work makes one free. A sign with this phrase on it was placed by Rudolf Hà ¶ss over the gates of Auschwitz. Asocial was one of the several categories of people targeted by the Nazi regime. People in this category included homosexuals, prostitutes, Gypsies (Roma)  and thieves. Auschwitz  was the largest and most infamous of the Nazis concentration camps. Located near Oswiecim, Poland, Auschwitz was divided into 3 main camps, at which an estimated 1.1 million people were murdered. B Words Babi Yar  is the event in which  the Germans killed all the Jews in Kiev on September 29 and 30, 1941. This was done in retaliation for the bombing of German administration buildings in occupied Kiev between September 24 and 28, 1941. During these tragic days, Kiev Jews, Gypsies (Roma) and Soviet prisoners of war were taken to the Babi Yar ravine and shot. An estimated 100,000 people were killed at this location. Blut und Boden is a German phrase that translates to  blood and soil. This was a phrase used by Hitler to mean that all people of German blood have the right and duty to live on German soil. Bormann, Martin  (June 17, 1900 - ?) was Adolf Hitlers personal secretary. Since he controlled access to Hitler, he was considered one of the most powerful men in the Third Reich. He liked to work behind the scenes and to stay out of the public spotlight, earning him the nicknames the Brown Eminence and the man in the shadows. Hitler viewed him as an absolute devotee, but Bormann had high ambitions and kept his rivals from having access to Hitler. While he was in the bunker during Hitlers last days, he left the bunker on May 1, 1945. His future fate has become one of the unsolved mysteries of this century. Hermann Gà ¶ring was his sworn enemy. Bunker is a  slang word for Jews hiding places within the ghettos. C Words Comite de Defense des Juifs is French for  Jewish Defense Committee. It was an underground movement in Belgium established in 1942. D Words Death March refers to the long, forced marches of concentration camp prisoners from one camp to another closer to Germany as the Red Army approached from the east in the last few months of World War II. Dolchstoss means  a stab in the back in German. A popular myth at the time claimed that the German military had not been defeated in World War I, but that the Germans had been stabbed in the back by Jews, socialists, and liberals who forced them to surrender. E Words Endlà ¶sung means Final Solution in German. This was the name of the Nazis program to kill every Jew in Europe. Ermchtigungsgesetz means  The Enabling Law in German. The Enabling Law was passed March 24, 1933, and allowed Hitler and his government to create new laws that did not have to agree with the German constitution. In essence, this law gave Hitler dictatorial powers. Eugenics is the social Darwinist principle of strengthening the qualities of a race by controlling inherited characteristics. The term was coined by Francis Galton in 1883. Eugenics experiments were done during the Nazi regime on people who were deemed life unworthy of life. Euthanasia Program was a Nazi-created program in 193 that was to secretly but systematically kill mentally and physically disabled people, including Germans, who were housed in institutions. The code name for this program was Aktion T-4. It is estimated that over 200,000 people were killed in the Nazi Euthanasia Program. G Words Genocide is the deliberate and systematic killing an entire people. Gentile is a  term referring to someone who is not Jewish. Gleichschaltung means  coordination in German and refers to the act of reorganizing all social, political and cultural organizations to be controlled and run according to Nazi ideology and policy. H Words Haavara was the transfer agreement between Jewish leaders from Palestine and the Nazis. Hftlingspersonalbogen refers to prisoner registration forms at the camps. Hess, Rudolf  (April 26, 1894 - August 17, 1987) was deputy to the Fà ¼hrer and successor-designate after Hermann Gà ¶ring. He played an important role in using geopolitics to gain land. He was also involved in the Anschluss of Austria and the administration of the Sudetenland. A devoted worshipper of Hitler, Hess flew to Scotland on May 10, 1940 (without the Fà ¼hrers approval) to a plea for Hitlers favor in an effort to make a peace agreement with Britain. Britain and Germany denounced him as crazy and sentenced to life imprisonment. The sole prisoner at Spandau after 1966, he was found in his cell, hung with an electric cord at age 93 in 1987. Himmler, Heinrich  (October 7, 1900 - May 21, 1945) was head of the SS, the Gestapo, and the German police. Under his direction, the SS grew into a massive so-called racially pure Nazi elite. He was in charge of the concentration camps and believed that the liquidation of the unhealthy and bad genes from society would help better and purify the Aryan race. In April 1945, he tried to negotiate a peace with the Allies, bypassing Hitler. For this, Hitler expelled him from the Nazi Party and from all offices he held. On May 21, 1945, he attempted to escape but was stopped and held by the British. After his identity was discovered, he swallowed a hidden cyanide pill that was noticed by an examining doctor. He died 12 minutes later. J Words Jude means  Jew in German, and this word often appeared on the Yellow Stars that Jews were forced to wear. Judenfrei means  free of Jews in German. It was a popular phrase under the Nazi regime. Judengelb means  Jewish yellow in German. It was a term for the yellow Star of David badge that Jews were ordered to wear. Judenrat, or  Judenrte in plural, means Jewish council in German. This term referred to a group of Jews who enacted the German laws in the ghettos. Juden raus! means  Jews out! in German. A dreaded phrase, it was shouted by the Nazis throughout the ghettos when they were trying to force Jews from their hiding places. Die Juden sind unser Unglà ¼ck! translates to  The Jews Are Our Misfortune in German. This phrase was often found in the Nazi-propaganda newspaper,  Der Stuermer. Judenrein means  cleansed of Jews in German. K Words Kapo  is a  position of leadership for a prisoner in one of the Nazi concentration camps, which entailed collaborating with the Nazis to help run the camp. Kommando were labor squads made up of camp prisoners. Kristallnacht, or  Night of Broken Glass, occurred on November 9 and 10, 1938. The Nazis initiated a pogrom against Jews in retaliation for the assassination of Ernst vom Rath. L Words Lagersystem was the system of camps that supported the death camps. Lebensraum means  living space in German. The Nazis believed that there should be areas attributed to only one race and that the Aryans needed more living space. This became one of the Nazis chief objectives and shaped their foreign policy; the Nazis believed they could gain more space by conquering and colonizing the East. Lebensunwertes Lebens means  life unworthy of life in German. This term derived from the work The Permission to Destroy Life Unworthy of Life (Die Freigabe der Vernichtung lebensunwerten Lebens) by Karl Binding and Alfred Hoche, published in 1920. This work was referring to the mentally and physically handicapped and regarded the killing of these segments of society as a healing treatment. This term and this work became a base for the right of the state to kill unwanted segments of the population. Lodz Ghetto  was  a ghetto established in Lodz, Poland   on February 8,  1940. The 230,000 Jews of Lodz were ordered into the ghetto. On May 1, 1940, the ghetto was sealed. Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski, who had been appointed the Elder of the Jews, attempted to save the ghetto by making it a cheap and valuable industrial center to the Nazis. Deportations began in January 1942 and the ghetto was liquidated by August 1944. M Words Machtergreifung means  seizure of power in German. The term was used when referring to the Nazis seizure of power in 1933. Mein Kampf  is the two-volume book written by Adolf Hitler. The first volume was  written during his time in Landsberg Prison and published in July 1925. The book became a staple of Nazi culture during the Third Reich. Mengele, Josef  (March 16, 1911 - February 7, 1979?) was a Nazi doctor at Auschwitz who was notorious for his medical experiments on twins and dwarves. Muselmann  was a  slang term used in the Nazi concentration camps for a prisoner who had lost the will to live and was thus just one step from being dead. O Words Operation Barbarossa was the code name for the surprise German attack on the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941, which broke the Soviet-Nazi Non-Aggression Pact and plunged the Soviet Union into World War II. Operation Harvest Festival was the code name for the liquidation and mass killings of the remaining Jews in the Lublin area that occurred on November 3, 1943. An estimated 42,000 people were shot while loud music was played to drown out the shootings. It was the last Aktion of Aktion Reinhard. Ordnungsdienst means  order service in German and refers to the ghetto police, which was made up of Jewish ghetto residents. To organize was camp slang for prisoners acquiring materials illicitly from the Nazis. Ostara was a  series of anti-Semitic pamphlets published by Lanz von Liebenfels between 1907 and 1910. Hitler bought these regularly and in 1909, Hitler sought out Lanz and asked for back copies. Oswiecim, Poland was the town where the Nazi death camp Auschwitz was built. P Words Porajmos  means  the Devouring in Romani. It was a term used by the Roma (Gypsies) for the Holocaust. Roma was among the victims of the Holocaust. S Words Sonderbehandlung, or  SB for short, means special treatment in German. It was a code word used for the methodical killing of Jews. T Words Thanatology is the science of producing death. This was the description given during the Nuremberg trials to the medical experiments performed during the Holocaust. V Words Vernichtungslager means  extermination camp or death camp in German. W Words White Paper was issued by Great Britain on May 17, 1939, to limit the immigration to Palestine to 15,000 persons a year. After 5 years, no Jewish immigration was permitted unless with Arab consent. Z Words Zentralstelle fà ¼r Jà ¼dische Auswanderung means  Central Office for Jewish Emigration in German. It was set up in Vienna on August 26, 1938 under Adolf Eichmann. Zyklon B  was the poison gas used to kill millions of people in the gas chambers.

Monday, February 17, 2020

MIS Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words - 1

MIS - Assignment Example One is able to follow through the procedure where the supply supplies the business goods and they are paid by the accounts clerk. On receiving the goods, the store is updated (ordered) and the good s available for sale can be sold to a customer. Note that the same location may be shown on successive processes (e.g. Order Clerk in the case of processes 1 and 3). The reason for breaking them down is to show that a decision is taken and the second process is dependent on that. In this case, for example, not ALL orders result in activation of the reorder process - only those where the order requires new stock to be ordered. When creating the DFD caution has to be excised when balancing the data flows. For instance once the store is out of stock, more goods are ordered then purchased. Similarly, numbering system is just a simple way that enables one to tell which processes decompose.It is important to note that those process that decompose are simply broken down but may be joined again at a higher level. Though the diagram does not give a detailed account of some other processes such as what would happen in the event that a credit check fails, it gives a general idea of what basically happens when transactions are made within the business